put up your dukes, asshole

put up your dukes, asshole

Over the past couple of days, I’ve heard from a number of friends with questions about what they should do in response to the outcome of the election; how they can have a impact in the face of the administration that will be in The White House in January. I’ve written this post with those folks in mind.

1. He’s going to be President. And even if you magically get rid of him, then you have Mike Pence. 

I don’t say this to suggest that people shouldn’t be in the streets chanting “Not my president!” this week and throughout the four years he (presumably) will be in office. It’s INCREDIBLY important that this is happening. It’s obviously cathartic for those who are involved, but it also sends a message to him and to those who will work with him (like the Republican-led Senate and House) that he does not have a resounding mandate from the American people. (He may have been given the keys to the car, but our hands are firmly on the parking brake.) It also sends a valuable message internationally: we’re not all xenophobic, racist, sexist assholes with messiah complexes and we don’t want to be told what to do by someone who is. Many of us, in fact, know how to and would like to play nicely, with the recognition that the global sandbox is large – and diverse.

I DO say this because I’ve seen people share ideas for how to prevent his ascension and I think it’s a waste of time and energy that is going to be greatly needed over the next four years. And it ignores the reality that Mike Pence may not be a blowhard, but he IS a homophobic prick who wants to take control of our bodies away from women and that, even if we get rid of Pence, the next in line is Speaker Paul Ryan. (Shudder.)

We need to confront reality: this is the card we have been dealt. Play it.

2. Stay and do your part.

For those of you who are talking about leaving? That’s nice for you, but there are a whole bunch of folks who don’t have that luxury and could use your help.

3. Educate yourself. Just because he doesn’t understand how the government works doesn’t mean you shouldn’t either.

In addition to the fact that he is a liar, a pig, and a racist, xenophobic, sexist creep, the thing that has driven me most batty about him is that he doesn’t seem to know how government works. He hasn’t read the Constitution (Could someone get this man a copy of the Constitution for Dummies?), he doesn’t grasp checks and balances and the limitations of the Executive Office and – which is weird for a Republican – he seems to think more power sits in the federal government (versus with the states) than actually does. The asshat doesn’t even know what Obamacare is, except that he doesn’t like it. I supported Hillary, in part, for the same reason I hire someone who knows how to use a camera when we need to film something; she knows how it works.

The thing is, a fair number of us need to pull out our U.S. Civics textbooks too, if we’re going to be able to be effective in response to the shit that is going to be flying our way. In particular, it is important to know what gets decided at the state/local versus federal level. For many of us who are lucky enough to live in “blue” states, we can advocate for and support our state, county, and city-level lawmakers to pass legislation that reflects our values and protects our neighbors and which can counter more hateful decisions that are being made at the federal level. (In most cases, state law overrides federal law.) We can also pay attention to what is happening at the state, county, and city-level in OTHER states and engage our friends who live there to be involved and do the same.

The kinds of issues that are decided locally versus at the federal level include many/most voting rights issues, education policy, LGBTQ discrimination/anti-discrimination policies, reproductive rights, police/criminal justice reform, and more. It is something about which you can be hopeful because you HAVE POWER.

4. We have allies at the federal level. 

While I hope they don’t choose to obstruct for the sake of being obstructionists – like their GOP brethren did in response to Obama – there are quite a few Democrats in the House and Senate who will be grabbing hands and playing the most important game of Red Rover EVER. They may represent you, they may not. But they need to hear from you when the time comes. And those who don’t seem like obvious allies? They need to hear from you too. There are plenty of GOP members of Congress who think he is bat shit crazy. Appeal to their better selves.

5. Don’t reinvent the wheel. Support the folks who were doing work before and will continue to do tomorrow and the day after as well.

I’ve seen some folks talk online about starting new organizations. PLEASE avoid the temptation. Of course, I say this with the SIGNIFICANT caveat that Black Lives Matter is relatively newly created and has had an invaluable impact. But it was done so organically and because there was a gap that needed to be filled and its message resonated with those who became involved and who may not have been involved otherwise. (Read Jeff Chang’s We Gon’ Be Alright for his take on their origin story and because Jeff is one of the most important voices in this country.) So, sure, if there IS a gap, fill it. But educate yourself first and consider making the groups who are not as strong as they could be STRONG.

I know of LOTS of groups who are getting by with minimal staff and tiny budgets that could use volunteers, people who can help them to get their messages out, and MONEY to help them to change the world. And I would be happy to share them with you if you’re looking to have an impact on a particular issue.

6. Subscribe to a newspaper.

I’m serious. Pay for your content. The next President has been hostile to the press, particularly those who call him out on his lies. WE NEED THEM. They fact check his bullshit. They let us know what is UP. And they NEEDS TO GET PAID to be able to continue to do so or they go away.

7. SCOTUS are people.

I am admittedly terrified about the impact that he will have on the Supreme Court – for generations to come. But while it can be scary that many decisions that affect our lives are decided by NINE people, they are in fact people. And one of the criteria they consider when they make their decisions is whether or not the country is READY for the change that would result from their decisions. So, get your shit together and pay attention to the SCOTUS docket (the SCOTUS blog is your friend) and, when an issue that is important to you is coming up, TALK ABOUT IT. Share news stories about it. In a couple of months, Aggregate is going to be on your case to talk about transgender issues for this very reason. SHOW UP.

8. Rock the Vote EVERY Day.

About twenty years ago I moved to Los Angeles to work at Rock the Vote. I ran a campaign that aimed to help young people understand that policy change happened on a day-to-day basis; that Election Day was not the only chance you had to have your voice heard. We traveled the country looking for stories of real young people who were getting skate parks built, overturning city council decisions to prevent all ages shows, increasing funding for higher education. And we found the little bastards. They recognized their ability to have an impact on issues that mattered to them. Please do the same. And please ask me – and my team – when you need help to do so. Our jobs became more difficult on November 8, but our passion for social justice persists.

Put up your dukes, asshole, we’re coming to get you.

If you have any more ideas, please share in the comments.

the achievement gap

the achievement gap

We recently passed Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn’s new book A Path Appears around the office. From the publisher: “With scrupulous research and on-the-ground reporting, the authors assay the art and science of giving, determine some of today’s most successful local and global initiatives to fight inequality, and evaluate particularly effective forms of help such as early childhood education.” As we took turns reading the book and flipped those final pages, we were each struck by different chapters. This post is the third and final in a series inspired by the book. Read the first and second posts.

Grace:
When I was six years old, I was the lowest achieving kid in class. I knew it because our scores were clearly written on the board for all to see. And the one at the bottom, usually me, was given several hits with a bamboo switch.

This was the Chinese education system, and I was an American kid whose only other education experience at the time was half-day kindergarten, complete with nap and recess. After moving to my new school, the injustice I felt a age six was insufferable.

But here’s a twist: I wasn’t the only one who got the switch. The kids who sat near me also got it. To eliminate this achievement gap, the teacher made it the other students’ business to make sure I caught up. We were in it together.

As an adult, I now understand what’s truly unjust is that many children don’t have access to a good education. American elementary school students are also punished for underachievement. If an elementary school returns low standardized test scores, children often have school funding taken away, and some of their teachers fired.

In America—where a child’s ZIP code and skin color are significant factors that determine academic opportunity—it’s a grossly unfair way to be held accountable. It’s also grossly unfair that children are held accountable when CEOs are not, but that’s another story. With these pejorative tactics, there is little hope for lifting achievement, equitably or otherwise.

Dominique:
The achievement limited by those factors—ZIP code, skin color and the layered and complex challenges tangled up in them—isn’t just limited to academics.

My first job after college was managing programs for at-risk girls—from middle schoolers in gang-impacted neighborhoods to teens with incarcerated mothers and those who were incarcerated themselves. It was an up-close and personal look at the way cycles of poverty, abuse, and incarceration play out in real lives.

What really resonated with me from reading this chapter, was the idea that solving problems—teen pregnancy, job preparedness, academic achievement—requires looking far beyond the problem itself. Acknowledging and addressing head-on the complex challenges faced by vulnerable populations, and providing not only the technical skills they might need—like access to contraception and the knowledge of how to use it, for example—but the hope and determination to envision a future where there are other possibilities.

Grace:
Agreed! This book is about spreading opportunity. Kristoff and WuDunn offer innovative thinking and models that came with statistical evidence. They lay out a clear case that early investments offer the highest returns.

Dominique:
And it’s important to note that there are many individuals and organizations that are working to make meaningful change, particularly when it comes to children and disparities in education and elsewhere. We’re lucky to work with some, like the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. We count others as our neighbors here in Seattle, such as the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation—particularly their work on education pathways in Washington state.

Grace:
Reading A Path Appears together connected us through stories—the stories in the book and our own. I hope as more people read this book and have substantive conversations, more people realize it’s in everyone’s interest to lift others up. If we don’t, we all hurt.

 

Photo credit: Don Harder, via Flickr.

radical comedy: you are what you eat

radical comedy: you are what you eat

An open comedy competition that simultaneously benefits the arts and sustainable agriculture? That’s radical.

As a (relative) newcomer to Seattle, I’m enjoying learning about the diverse organizations and causes with roots in the Pacific Northwest. Each month, I will highlight a local group whose radical work inspires me to be more radical in my own work and daily life. 

For the second year in a row, Comedy Contest for a Cause will combine comedy, the arts, and social change into one great event. Last year, comedians performed sketches that promoted moving the world beyond oil toward sustainable energy use. This year’s theme is Food of the Future with the aim of increasing awareness about sustainable agriculture and raising money for local farm and permaculture project Morethana Farm.

Led and maintained by a dedicated group of volunteers, Morethana Farm is a six-acre working organic agriculture and agroforestry project located 35 miles outside downtown Seattle. The farm is supported by a partnership of several local organizations, including Antioch University Seattle, sustainable agriculture nonprofit Pacific Bamboo Resources, and clean energy nonprofit SeaChar.

Comedy Contest for a Cause aims to educate the public on the importance of sustainable agriculture while supporting and encouraging people to express themselves through art and comedy. An open call for stand up and sketches allows anyone to write a sketch and have a chance to perform. The winner, selected by a panel of judges, will receive bragging rights and a $500 cash prize. Proceeds from the event will be donated to Morethana Farm.

The show is June 6 at The Ballard Underground at 8:30 p.m. For information on tickets, check out their Facebook page and be sure to RSVP. I’ll be there, so find me and say hello!

Are you interested in learning more and volunteering with Morethana Farm? Check out their volunteer opportunities, follow them on Twitter, and like them on Facebook.

Learn about other radical local organizations we’ve featured, including Project VioletRain City Rock Camp for Girls, Seal Sitters, Undriving, and Blue Earth Alliance.

Image by Eliza Mutino, Sterling College.

powerful photography for social change

powerful photography for social change

Using documentary photography to inspire positive change in attitudes, behavior, and policy? That’s radical.

As a (relative) newcomer to Seattle, I’m enjoying learning about the diverse organizations and causes with roots in the Pacific Northwest. Each month, I will highlight a local group whose radical work inspires me to be more radical in my own work and daily life.

Photography speaks to people differently, and often a simple image isn’t simply an image. As a photographer I’ve always been enamored with the art form and the myriad ways it can be used to improve the world by mobilizing a community to make a change, or even just brighten someone’s day.

Blue Earth Alliance sponsors artists and works to ensure photographers and filmmakers around the world are given a stage to present their work on critical environmental and social issues. They have helped raise almost a million dollars through membership donations, and require all sponsored work to be educational or informational in some capacity. The Alliance has focused its efforts on issues like global warming and the Artic, but also issues that are sometimes outside of the scope of the mainstream media, such as racism in the farming community, grandmothers in AIDS-ravaged Africa, and the loss of open space in Los Angeles.

Many of the artists who have worked with the Alliance have gone on to win accolades, be featured in galleries, publish books, and receive grants. One such artist—Seattle-based Daniel Beltrá—is currently a featured artist and was the 2011 Wildlife Photographer of the Year for the Natural History Museum. Daniel Beltrá’s newest project, Our Warming World, “asks us to consider the landscape as a place we have altered, all while striving to coexist within the natural world.” According to Beltrá, “rather than merely recording the changes in the environment, this body of work seeks to enhance our awareness of the intersection of nature’s power and fragility, asking us to reconsider our view of the planet and how we inhabit it.”

Also currently featured is Amazon Headwaters by Bruce Farnsworth, which highlights small groups of residents across the upper Amazon region leading cutting-edge programs in research, conservation, education, and sustainable communities. The final featured project is The Truth Told Project by Sarah Fretwell, which highlights the conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, including daily realities and the rampant sexual violence.

Later in 2014, Blue Earth Alliance will host Collaborations for Cause, a two-day conference in Seattle for nonprofits, photographers, change-makers, and communications professionals. The conference will cover the collaborative future of storytelling and will feature panel discussions, case studies, and breakout sessions. Keep an eye on their news page for more details in the coming months.

Want to learn more about Blue Earth Alliance? Like it on Facebook, follow it on Twitter, learn more about their featured projects, read their blog, and be sure not to miss them on Instagram.

Did you miss our other Radical Locals features? Read more about Project Violet, Seattle’s Rain City Rock Camp for Girls, the Seal Sitters, and Undriving.

Image by Daniel Beltrá from his new book SPILL.